Jury say no to Huawei’s trade secret claims

Yiren Huang worked for Huawei designing NVMe storage controllers from 2011 to 2013. He left and co-founded CNEX, a company that specializes in similar chips.

Huawei contended Huang appropriated Plaintiffs’ trade secrets and poached fourteen Huawei employees. Huawei sued, but after a six-week trial a Texas jury refused to accept Huawei’s claims. It did decide “that Huang violated his Patent Agreement by not disclosing the patents he filed on behalf of CNEX.”

However, it refused to award damages to Huawei because the “violation did not harm Plaintiffs.” The jury also did not award any damages for CNEX’s counterclaims. No money or patents changed hands.

CNEX has since raised US$23 million from Microsoft, Dell, and others.

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To conquer: TV, glasses, car

TV & Smart glasses in red

Huawei is soon to announce an 8K TV with a 5G connection, the first is what will be a strategic family of TV products. He Gang, President of the Consumer Products Division, included TV as one of the 8 primary products in Huawei’s “1 + 8 + N” future plans.

While the TVs have longed been rumored, the surprise was that He listed “smart” glasses as a second primary product. Perhaps in a few years, many of us will be walking around with augmented reality glasses. If so, Huawei wants to supply them.

Google Glasses failed because the technology was too early. Google is now bringing then back for business uses. Huawei hopes to catch a wave in a few years.

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Yoshida: “The race to 5G technology has been already won by Huawei.”

Junko Yoshida at EE Times is one of the half-dozen best tech reporters in the world, not given to careless comments. I do think she is a little ahead of herself because it is still early, but I respect her point of view.

Huawei is generally at the top of the heap, but Ericsson is actually ahead in some aspects. Ericsson has also made the decision to match Huawei’s prices on major bids.

Total worldwide sales this year should be between 200,000 & 350,000 radios. Next year, over a million radios are likely to be sold. Much is still to happen. That said, it is hard to see how anyone can catch up to Huawei and its US$15 billion research budget.

Between 35% and 50% of 5G cells in the next two years will be installed in China. Huawei will get at least 40% of the volume, Ericsson 10% or less.

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BBC uses unproven claims by U.S. gov agents

Nokia is scrambling not to lose US$2 billion a year of sales in China. CTO Marcus Weldon stuck his foot in his mouth at the BBC, making much of an obviously biased report about Huawei security.

The claim, “In virtually all categories we studied, we found Huawei devices to be less secure than comparable devices from other vendors,” was made by an outfit called Finite State. They are contractors to the U.S. security forces and some are former employees.

Marcus piled on thoroughly unproven claims of Huawei security problems. Huawei’s software has some problems. So does all software, including that of the U.S. National Security Agency.

Once the U.S. decided to go to war against Huawei, of course a massive propaganda and disinformation campaign began. Truth is always the first casualty of any war, and the CIA has specialized since 1947 in “presenting the U.S. position in a form that is most convincing.”

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Google Pixel 4 copies Huawei Mate 20 – from last year

“Huawei pretty much had an extremely similar design for its Mate 20 series last year,” writes Tegan Jones at Gizmodo.

Huawei Mate-20 2018

Huawei Mate-20 2018

“I was again reminded of a Huawei product, this time the Mate 20 Pro of last year, which had the same square camera module filled with lenses.” Vlad Savov confirmed, adding, “When Google announced its new interface gestures in Android Q, I got a sense of déjà vu, because I’d already seen them in Huawei’s EMUI”

Google is ahead in many things, Huawei in others.

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Huawei 5G videos for geeks

Peter Clarke, a medical student with a hobby, visits telecom sites in England and shoots videos. Along the way, he provides more technical detail on 4G and especially 5G than any other source I know.

Clarke’s second video is from Yorkshire.

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Vodafone turns on Huawei in Spain

Vodafone didn’t release speed or coverage but has something in 15 cities in Spain. The network is Huawei, although for now they are not expanding Huawei in the core network. The available phones are Samsung, LG, and Xiaomi, but not Huawei.

Vodafone has 90 MHz of spectrum at 3.5 GHz, which should deliver customer speeds of 100-500 Mbps. Voda only provides the meaningless comment “up to 1 gigabit.” Coverage is “15 cities” without detail.

Vodafone has also turned on some radios in Italy and will turn on some in England on July 3. I have friends at Voda who are very satisfied by Huawei service and support.

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Huawei’s Ark probably is better than Android

Dr Wang Chenglu has written an outstanding account of how he led the development of Huawei’s alternative to Android. He strongly believes that replacing Android’s Linux file system with f2fs seriously speeds up the system. The Ark just-in-time compiler appears well optimized.

Android started in 2005, using Linux, a system designed for desktops. Because so many phones were using Android, major changes are hard to make. By the time Huawei began the project now called Ark/Hong Meng in 2012, the technology had improved.

The Huawei team identified dozens of ways Android could be improved and gradually implemented them. I’ve no ability to test them, but the choices Wang made correspond to some of the best thinking on operating systems.

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China will pass everyone, U.S.-Huawei war won’t stop it (First look)

China just officially launched “commercial” 5G service, moving up the date from October 1st. The three Chinese giants previously disclosed plans for 90,000-150,000 cell sites in the fall. In comparison, British Telecom projects only about 2,000 cells in 2019. China soon also will pass the U.S., where most telcos have so few 5G sites active they won’t release the number.

Russia’s Sputnik, Britain’s Financial Times, and other Western media speculate without evidence that the U.S.-Huawei ban will hold back the Chinese. Very few key components can only be sourced in the U.S.

Fortunately, almost everything needed for a 5G network is available outside the U.S. or replaceable. 90% of the components used for Huawei’s 5G are not exclusive to U.S. vendors.

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Chinese memory chipmakers closing the gap

Trendforce/DRAM Exchange projects Yangtze Memory Technologies will be producing 64 layer flash memory chips by the end of 2019 and 128 layer by the end of 2020. Samsung expects to lead the pack to 128, shipping in the first quarter. Others will be later in the year.

YMTC will give Huawei a domestic source of memory chips, essentially during the U.S. trade war. YMTC is part of the Tsinghua Unigroup that also controls the Unisoc fabless semiconductor company, which recently announced a 5G chipset to be produced at TSMC around yearend.

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