Huawei planning $300 5G phone

Peter Zhou told FT “Next year, some people say we may see [5G] smartphones at $300 and I think that’s very much possible.” That price makes sense.

Huawei sells the Mate 20 Lite for about US$250. The additional parts for 5G probably cost US$30-60 this year. By next year, the price for the 5G parts – and the basic phone – will be lower.

All the 5G phones shipping today cost over US$1,000, establishing an image of luxury. The high cost hasn’t deterred the Koreans, who sold more than 400,000 the first two months. (Some with a carrier subsidy,)

The US$600-700 Xiaomi Mi Mix 3 5G phone with slider is available already from Vodafone in England.

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Hong Meng OS: ?60% faster

Huawei claims that its version of Android will be totally compatible and much faster. It hopes to ship in the fall, although that’s not certain.

The company believes it is making a better version of Android. “The performance improvement on this operating system will exceed 60%, which is a future-oriented microkernel. … Huawei has identified four major causes through detailed analysis and repeated verifications and introduced Android optimization and intelligent memory scheduling through the introduction of AI. , intelligent CPU scheduling and intelligent storage adjustments are resolved. Among them, by replacing the Android native file system with the F2FS file system, the problem of storage fragmentation is solved.”

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Aptoide in Portugal could replace Google Apps

Aptoide is an alternate app store that claims 200,000,000 users. It is popular with gamers and works with Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo. The CEO told Dinheiro Vivo it was already in contact with Huawei. It could be linked in weeks.

I as a user can go to Aptoide and download Android apps. It doesn’t ask the brand of my phone.

In addition, even if I bought a Huawei phone in the future, I as an individual could presumably go the Google app store and download the Google apps I want. Nobody knows for sure, including senior government people.

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Huawei looks to ship 50,000-80,000+ bases in China in 2019

Update July 30: China is accelerating the 5G build and the figure will be much higher.

The news broke that 90,000-150,000 Chinese 5G sites will go live in October and things will accelerate after that. Ericsson will probably get 10% of the order, part of a political deal China reached with the EU several years ago. Nokia Shanghai Bell opted out because Suri thought the price was too low.

Huawei and ZTE will fight for the rest of the contract. Ren said, “Last week, in public bidding by China Mobile, we won contracts to build 5G networks for 37 of the 40 cities.”

The Chinese will have far more 5G in place by year-end than the entire Western World. The three giant telcos will quickly expand to over a million base stations and absorb an enormous amount of equipment.

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Editorial: Pressure on Korea is horrifying

A personal note. The possible use of the North Korean nuclear weapon is a deep and historically important issue. China and South Korea are crucial in any resolution. Even if the attack on Huawei for spying is justified, it is a profound mistake to force South Korea to penalize China’s national champion.

Spying is what great powers always do. Action on Huawei is not going to change that. I am horrified that my country is putting the Huawei issue before the nuclear issue.

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ARM cut critical within a year

Every major chip needs a brain, a “CPU.” Huawei buys the design from Arm, a British company. The CPUs for something like Huawei’s 5G chip are literally hundreds of millions of transistors. Arm does a great job designing CPUs and sells them at a price much lower than it would cost to do your own design. Huawei and over a thousand others buy from Arm.

I wrote a few days ago that Huawei could obtain elsewhere 90% of what they buy from the U.S. and pointed to ways to solve the last 10%. Designing Huawei’s own core is likely to take more than a year.

This is potentially the most severe blow of the U.S. war, although it won’t be an issue until Huawei needs new chip designs, perhaps in 6-9 months.

Quote is from the Washington Post.

Losing Arm as a supplier would “cripple key Huawei chips.”

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Huawei in BT 5G release – invisible ink

22 May 2019

Oppo, One Plus at BT; URLLC 2023

BT huawei phone in release 230

BT told reporters they yanked the Huawei Mate 20 from the announcement because of the U.S. war. It forgot to take Huawei out of the press release. I discovered what you see at left when I pasted in for this article. (type made larger)I’m sure someone in the Chinese embassy is already talking to the government – if they can figure out who’s running the British government as May considers how to resign.

The deployment is almost surely small. I draw that conclusion from the failure of BT to release availability maps or the number of homes passed/radios installed. The only interesting news is that the pr says BT will start URLLC in 2023.

They are the first in the world to confirm URLLC, the faster version that drops “air latency” from ~10 ms to 5 ms or less. True latency – the time from a phone to the nearest server – will be ~5 ms less than the 15-30 ms without URLLC. A little more here

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Huawei Atlas: Most effective surveillance in the world?

Huawei’s Atlas computing platform analyzes video clips from 20,000 cameras in real time for Shenzen. The “traffic brain” “can search for photos from its library of 1 billion photos in just seconds and analyze the video clips provided by more than 20,000 cameras in real time. It has boosted road capacity in Shenzhen by around 8%” Huawei annual report.

It has also “resulted in a tenfold increase in law enforcement efficiency.” Many security agencies around the world – not just in China – are likely fascinated by the potential.

Shenzhen already has some traffic cameras networked for a similar purpose. What Huawei brings to the table in an AI system capable of supporting 20,000 cameras.

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Can Huawei Report sell a subscription to Huawei?

It appears I could go to jail if I sell a subscription to Huawei. It’s an American business and probably covered by the blockade.

The ITU international telecommunications treaty has an exemption from blockades that was designed to allow Iranians and Cubans to subscribe to publications like the Washington Post over the Internet.

The U.S. refused to sign the treaty and walked out of the ITU WCIT meeting.

I hereby give permission for any of my subscribers outside the United States to copy The Huawei Report if you want to share it with an Iranian, Cuban or similar enemy of the U.S. government.

Please don’t tell me. I don’t want to go to prison.

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90% of Huawei U.S. purchases can be rapidly replaced.

D.C. has a fantasy that the world stops at Washington’s command. The U.S. is ahead in a handful of high-tech fields, but fewer and fewer. My research shows that about 90% of the purchases from the U.S. can be replaced within months from other parts of the world. Update 5/22. British company ARM blocked Huawei from using Arm designs for future 5G & AI chips. This could be a major problem. Update 6/17 Huawei and China are well on the way to replacing Android, ARM, and RF chips. The only thing that’s biting is the Google blockade, costing tens of billions in phone sales.

For example, Huawei buys memory chips from Micron in the U.S. It could buy similar chips from SK Hynix in Korea, Toshiba in Japan, and imminently Yangtze Memory in China. Many of the most important parts already come from Asia, including screens for mobile phones. 

The hardest to replace will be RF for phones, advanced optics, FPGA’s, and chip design software. Here are some details and possible solutions. 

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Dave in Washington Post

Jeanne Whalen was kind enough to include me in her article. (Might have paywall)

“Unlike ZTE, Huawei makes some of its own semiconductor chips, and Huawei can tap alternative, non-U.S. suppliers for some parts and technology, analysts said. “There are very few [parts] they can’t just buy from Japan or Korea or France today,” said Dave Burstein, a telecom analyst for STL Partners who recently began publishing Huawei Report & News.

Huawei also has about $38 billion in cash and short-term securities it can tap to weather the storm, Burstein noted. And recent quarterly earnings reports from some U.S. tech firms have suggested that Huawei may have been stockpiling parts before the White House ban, in anticipation of a possible blockade, Burstein said.”

In a few minutes I’ll post “90% of Huawei U.S. purchases can be rapidly replaced,” after I fix a few things. It has the explanation and backup for what I say here.

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